2 Jewish Wedding Ceremony Scripts

  1. A Modern Jewish Wedding Ceremony Script With Sand Ceremony
  2. A Modern Gender Neutral Jewish Wedding Ceremony Script
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Jewish ceremonies often incorporate unique features like glass breaking or signing the Ketubah. Feel free to add or subtract these features to create a ceremony that reflects your personal Jewish identity.

A MODERN JEWISH WEDDING CEREMONY SCRIPT WITH SAND CEREMONY

PROCESSIONAL

Beginning of the wedding ceremony. Guests are Seated.

SIGNING OF THE KETUBAH

First we will have the signing of the Ketubah. The Ketubah is an ancient document and is a marriage contract that lays out the commitment that the couple has to each other. It is signed by two Jewish witnesses, neither of whom can be blood-related family members to the bride and groom.

BADEKEN

[After the Ketubah signing, there is a short but meaningful ritual where the groom covers the bride’s face with her veil. The veiling itself is a symbol of modesty, based upon the biblical account of Rebecca meeting Isaac. Some couples put a modern spin on by having the bride place a (yarmulke) on the groom.]

CHUPPAH

[At this point in the ceremony the couple to a canopy held up by four poles known as the the chuppah. This simple structure symbolizes the home that the bride and groom will create following their marriage. Both the bride and groom are usually escorted by their respective sets of parents. Once they arrived the bride circles the groom seven times. This symbolizes building a wall of love around their relationship. Seven is a sacred number in Judaism that represents the wholeness and completeness that they cannot attain separately. Some couples modernize this by circling around each other three times and then a finally both doing a figure of eight.]

INVOCATION

Dearly beloved,

We are gathered here today to celebrate the union of and A special thanks to all of you that travelled from far and wide to witness the promise these two are about to make to one another. We are here not only as guests. We are here to offer our love and support, and to stand with and as they begin this new chapter of their lives.

A marriage is a lifelong adventure. Today’s ceremony, while important, is only the beginning of that journey. Marriage is a challenge that will require and to have love and understanding. You must dedicate yourselves to each other, listen to each other, and be honest with each other. You will need laughter and forgiveness, tenderness and empathy.”

DECLARATION OF SUPPORT

“Today’s ceremony is only possible because of the lifetime of love and support and have received from their family and friends. Through those relationships these two have learned lessons that have informed them on how to be good partners and parents. As and join together in matrimony and prepare to create another family to join our tribe, they carry their shared knowledge of our people onwards, promoting the values and ideals that they learned from those who came before them.”

SAND CEREMONY

“We will now begin the Sand Ceremony. Through it and will symbolize the permanence of the commitment of their marital relationship. They will each pour separate containers of sand into a one vessel. Each of these grains represents a unique aspect of themselves. Their experiences, outlooks, feelings, and the events that shaped them into the person that stands before you. As these grains of sand intermingle in one shared vessel, they symbolize the merging of two individual lives into an inseparable pair. and , just as these grains of sand can never again be separated, so too will you be forever joined.”

DECLARATION OF INTENT

(Officiant To The Groom)

Do you , take this woman to be your lawfully wedded wife, to have and to hold, in sickness and in health, in good times and woe, for richer or poorer keeping yourself unto her for as long as you both shall live?

If so answer 'I do'.

(Groom to the Bride)

'I do.'

(Officiant To The Bride)

Do you , take this man to be your lawfully wedded husband, to have and to hold, in sickness and in health, in good times and woe, for richer or poorer keeping yourself unto him for as long as you both shall live?

If so answer I do.

(Bride to the Groom)

'I do.'

RING EXCHANGE

The couple will now exchange rings. These rings symbolize the never ending love you feel for each other. The ring has neither a beginning or an end, just as there is no beginning or end to what the partners give and receive. These rings will be a reminder of the vows you have taken today. By this ring you are consecrated to me according to the law of Moses and Israel.

, as a token of your intentions, please place this ring upon your (bride/groom/partner)’s finger and repeat after me: “, I give you this ring as a symbol of my love and faithfulness."

, as a token of your intentions, please place this ring upon your (bride/groom/partner)’s finger and repeat after me: “, I give you this ring as a symbol of my love and faithfulness."

BLESSING OF THE HANDS

and , please join hands. Looks at these hands for they are of your closest friend. They are strong and full of love. As you join hands today, you make the promise to love each other today, tomorrow, and forever.

Your future will be built by these hands. As the years pass, these hands will love you and cherish you. The slightest touch from these hands will give you comfort. These are the hands will hold your children. These are the hands will kept your family as one. When you have tears of sorrow or tears of joy, they will be wiped away by these hands.

THE SEVEN BLESSINGS

The Seven Blessings are now recited.

  1. Blessing over the wine — symbol of joy
  2. Blessing praising God to whom all creation proclaims praise
  3. God is praised as Creator of humanity
  4. God is praised Who created humanity in the Divine image.
  5. Hope for the messianic future
  6. Prayer for the happiness of the bride and groom
  7. The individual hope for happiness for the couple is combined with a prayer for joy in the messianic future.


After the seven blessings, the couple share a cup of wine.

BREAKING THE GLASS

The ceremony is concluded by the groom stamping on a glass and smashing it. This is the signal for the gathered people to cheer, dance, shout “Mazal Tov!”. Some couples choose to update this tradition by breaking the glass together with one swift smash in unison.

YICHUD -- PRIVATE REFLECTION

Once the just-married couple have processed out of the ceremony area, the final ritual takes place. The Yichud is considered to be one the most intimate and private parts of the day. The bride and groom spend time alone away from all the guests. It gives them to reflect on what just took place. Once the reflection is over they join the party!!!

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Who's Performing
Your Wedding?

Checkout the articles below to learn more about having your friend perform your wedding.

Three Reasons to Choose a
Friend or Family Member to Officiate Your Wedding

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Choosing a Wedding Officiant
What Are Your Options?

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Asking a Friend to
Officiate Your Wedding

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Will You
Marry Us?

The wedding gift package revolutionizing how you choose your officiant!

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Wedding Ceremony Quiz

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A MODERN GENDER-NEUTRAL JEWISH WEDDING CEREMONY SCRIPT



This ceremony script is a great ceremony template for modern contemporary couples. It includes the traditional elements of the Jewish faith that preserve its spiritual significance, but incorporates some romantic, modern themes, as well. Feel free to add, remove, change up the roles as needed for a non-binary couple, or otherwise readjust the dialogue and its sequence until it feels perfect to you.

PROCESSIONAL



Beginning of the wedding ceremony. Guests are standing after the entrance of the bride.

OFFICIANT: Before we start, I’d like everyone to join me in the very important and traditional custom of switching off your cell phones.

INVOCATION



OFFICIANT: Dearest friends, we’re standing here under the chuppah. It’s the symbol of the house that this couple before us will establish together. This structure is open on all four sides, as was the tent that Abraham opened in his infinite hospitality. And in keeping with tradition, to remember the seven days of creation, will walk around , to bring down the walls and symbolize the start of a new relationship.

(The designated partner walks around the stationary partner seven times)

OFFICIANT: Friends, you may now be seated.

Optional: Here, the officiant can tell stories about the couple, read a passage from the torah, or any other passages that the couple would like included.

DECLARATION OF INTENT AND VOWS



OFFICIANT: Now, the couple will exchange vows and declare their intent to enter into the union of marriage. , please repeat after me.

I, take you to be my husband/wife/spouse. I promise to cherish our love and our friendship today, tomorrow, and forever. I will trust you and honor you. I will laugh with you and cry with you. Through the best and the worst, Through the good days and the bad. As I have given you my hand to hold, So I give you my life to keep.

OFFICIANT: , will you repeat after me?

I, take you to be my husband/wife/spouse. I promise to cherish our love and our friendship today, tomorrow, and forever. I will trust you and honor you. I will laugh with you and cry with you. Through the best and the worst, Through the good days and the bad. As I have given you my hand to hold, So I give you my life to keep.

RING EXCHANGE



OFFICIANT: , you have a ring that you are going to bestow to , yes? Holding this ring, please repeat after me:

"I give you this sign, Of our love. An ever-present symbol, of the vows we have made today."

OFFICIANT: Now, , you have a ring that you are going to bestow to . Holding this ring, please repeat after me:

I give you this sign, of our love. An ever-present symbol, of the vows we have made today.

OFFICIANT: Mazel tov!

Optional: Both members of the couple pick up candle to jointly light a unity candle.

Optional: Officiant presents the wedding contract, the ketubah for the couple and/or witnesses to sign.

OFFICIANT: Praise to you, Lord our God, King of the universe, who created joy and gladness, bride and groom, gladness, jubilation, dancing, and delight, love and brotherhood, peace and fellowship. Blessed art thou, Oh Lord, who unites these two people in unity.

Optional: Officiant hands a glass of wine to . They takes a sip, and hand the glass back to the officiant. Next, the officiant hands the glass back to , who then to hands the glass to their new spouse.

OFFICIANT: It is my happy duty to announce you Husband(s) and Wife(s) (or Partners in Life).

Below is the "smashing of the glass" custom, which is often performed after the conclusion of the wedding ceremony.

First, the officiant sets napkin-wrapped glass on the ground. This way, shattered glass won't go everywhere. Next, one parter smashes glass and kisses the other. While there are various explanations for the origin of this tradition, the glass is a reminder of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem. The fragile state of glass also reminds us of the frailty of human relationships. Since even the strongest love is subject to breaking, the glass is broken to remind us that as it shatters, so may the marriage never break. ▲ TOP




Who's Performing
Your Wedding?

Checkout the articles below to learn more about having your friend perform your wedding.

Three Reasons to Choose a
Friend or Family Member to Officiate Your Wedding

Go To Article

Choosing a Wedding Officiant
What Are Your Options?

Go To Article

Asking a Friend to
Officiate Your Wedding

Go To Article

Will You
Marry Us?

The wedding gift package revolutionizing how you choose your officiant!

Learn More

Take The
Wedding Ceremony Quiz

Take Quiz
BECOME AN AMM MINISTER
  • Free Online Ordination
  • To Officiate Weddings.
  • Get Ordained Today!